Foreclosure Activity Drops to 3-Year Lows

New data released from RealtyTrac on Thursday show the foreclosure crisis is easing: Foreclosure notices filed during the first three months of 2011 dropped 27 percent compared with the first quarter of 2010. More than 681,000 homes received a foreclosure filing during the first quarter of 2011.

And while 215,046 borrowers lost their homes, that marks a 17 percent decrease year-over-year.

However, while the improvement may be encouraging, experts warn that the decrease in foreclosure activity is likely temporary.

“The nation’s housing market continued to languish in the first quarter, even as foreclosure activity fell to a three-year low,” says James Saccacio, RealtyTrac’s CEO. “Weak demand, declining home prices, and the lack of credit availability are weighing heavily on the market, which is still facing the dual threat of a looming shadow inventory of distressed properties and the probability that foreclosure activity will begin to increase again as lenders and servicers gradually work their way through the backlog of thousands of foreclosures that have been delayed due to improperly processed paperwork.”

Following this fall’s “robo-signing” scandal, in which banks were accused of processing foreclosures without proper reviews, banks have slowed their pace of foreclosures until they clean up their paperwork procedures, experts say. Otherwise, the number of foreclosures would be much higher for the quarter, says RealtyTrac spokesman Rick Sharga.

Meanwhile, Nevada continues to post the highest rate of foreclosure activity, followed by Arizona and California. Nevada alone had 32,000 properties, or one in every 35, receiving a foreclosure filing.

Source: “Foreclosures Off 30% This Year,” CNNMoney.com (April 14, 2011) and “Processing Delays Cut Foreclosure Activity by 27% in 1Q 2011: RealtyTrac,” HousingWire (April 14, 2011)

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